About your Search

20130115
20130123
SHOW
Today 7
( more )
STATION
SFGTV 137
SFGTV2 121
KGO (ABC) 47
KPIX (CBS) 37
KTVU (FOX) 37
KNTV (NBC) 19
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 18
KOFY 10
KICU 8
CSPAN2 6
KQED (PBS) 5
CNNW 3
CNN 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 473
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 473 (some duplicates have been removed)
and the great government consulting as they pick the products to bring a lot of innovation to san francisco. cory? give cory a round of applause. [applause] >> thank you, chris. thank you so much for all of your hard work, chris. none of this could be possible without your efforts. good evening. the good government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different re
. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to
in government. and over the last few years we have worked really hard to improve that park user's experience through the use of technology. and i want to start out before we talk a little about the app saying a if you thank yous. i really want to thank mayor lee to his incredible commitment to technology and frankly the recreation and park department. i want to thank supervisor chiu who has been a leader both in the parks world and in the technology world. sf city has really been a driving force behind helping government think about new ways, new and improved ways maybe for some of you they're old ways now. but new and improved ways for government to reach users of our programs and services. and i want to say the last special thank you to the folks from apple-liscious. this thing is awesome. this past year, the trust for public land which is a national parks organization determined that san francisco, which has 4,000 acres of open space and over 220 parks, over 15% of the city's land is open space. the trust for public land said we have the best urban park system in america. and the challeng
more efficient government, along with some very good entrepreneurial efforts that are reflected in today's announcements and some of our partners that are here today. so, three years later, after announcing this and after doing the first generation of open data legislation, open sf is still a very vigorous, and we want to do even more. we've teamed up again with board president david chiu who has been personally involved with this and helping us and guide us with his knowledge, having been a small business owner himself, with how we can do even better. and today we are announcing actually two areas of improvements to our piece of legislation that i think will get people even more excited. the first is after a couple of years of opening up some of the data streams in our city and seeing how this data had already started, some companies, some entrepreneurs develop applications, helped us already with identifying some additional needs in the city and involving more people, we want to do even more along that line. and, so, this legislation will allow us to establish, along with the
of san francisco. we think the best and brightest should be in city government. the people here tonight are proof that they are. finally, i want to mention a very meaningful thing for me to be here tonight on the night we are giving a lifetime of work to ed harrington. [applause] when i arrived in san francisco coming out of state employment some six years ago or so, ed was very generous in giving me advice. to say -- i will call. why are we doing this? who can i ask this question of? if i think it may have political implications or just to bounce it off him, he always has great devicadvice. personal thanks to ed harrington, as well. i will turn it back over to r m our emcee. >> a big round of applause. [applause] >> all right. thank you also my pleasure to introduce president of our board of supervisors, supervisor david chu. >> good government. evening. it's my honor to welcome you to our local version of the academy awards for city government. yes, please give it up. i think our awardees look absolutely stunning tonight. i want to welcome you all to city hall. thank you for joining u
see so much potential, so many amazing people, and we in city government have an opportunity to address so many problems and make so many things better. the campaign was a learning experience on so many levels. beyond that, i think you've learned something about yourself when you are putting yourself out there through the political process. i was very lucky that i had that opportunity because where i come from something as basic as free, democratic elections, that is a luxury. people participate in the democratic process. that is something that is quite amazing and remarkable. i think that you do not fully appreciate it if you have had it all your life. whereas someone who came from a place where that was not possible, i think that i have a unique appreciation for it. it was really an exciting thing to do. >> where would you place yourself now on the political spectrum? the left, the right? supervisor campos: i think the labels can mean a lot of different things. i see myself as someone who ultimately has tried to make things better for people. i have a progressive outlook in
majority in the house. that is a governing majority. he's going to have it on immigration and also on the debt ceiling. not sure he's going to have it on guns, but he's going to drive the really hard-line republicans crazy because he's going to be able to break off 40 or 50 of them for all these other things. chris: that seems to be true as much as the opposition is hotter and perhaps hardening out there on the right. it does seem that the center right and the center are in play and obama is making his move toward them successfully. >> their governing philosophy coming in is that the fever would break among the tea party folks, among the hard right, and also that just folks in the house would sort of move to the boehner philosophy, which is a governing philosophy. the sort of -- chris: in other words, you don't need a majority of the republicans to rule. >> you break the rule, which is what he's done on these big-ticket items. they have been meeting over these last couple of days to figure out wait forward. i think the president was smart to step into these debates early and often
to commit a gun crime. >> i am proud to be a new yorker today. i am proud to be part of this government. not just because new york has the first bill but because new york has the best bill. this is a complex multifaceted problem. this is a comprehensive bill that addresses the full panorama and spectrum of issues that come up. >> woodruff: other leaders, including new york city mayor michael bloomberg, have joined the call for action this week at a summit on gun violence in baltimore. >> the rate of firearms homicide in america is 20 times higher than it is in other economically advanced nations. we have got to change that. and it has to start this week. with real leadership from the white house. >> woodruff: maryland and delaware are also weighing new laws, as two new polls show national support for more gun control. the pew research center found a majority favors banning assault weapons and tracking gun sales. and a "washington post"/abc news survey out today found more than half of americans support a ban on assault weapons while nearly two-thirds would ban high capacity magazines. 5
relationship with the turkish government. it's a completely different world. it's completely opposite. when their armed forces show up, it's not really lacked upon as a good thin. this is why i want to say thank you to our military that's here today, to the army, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relationship and people get really, really tense when the guys in green show up, it makes me appreciate what we have all the more. there's one other thing i really appreciate, by the way, and i'll direct this to general speese being the trainer that he is, i got a whole new appreciation for muzzle discipline back there. i appreciate the fact that we drill that into our personnel that don't point anything you don't want to shoot at. because there's one point i was actu
enforcement. keeping data on where the guns are. the government stopped keeping those records in 2004 and improving the background check system. so there's more sharing of information. joe, the other path forward would be congressional action and we're told that the president will push for an assault weapons ban and expansion of the gun sales of all kinds. even if i tried to sell you a gun privately, that would require a background check and then limit the sale of high-capacity magazines. those are some of the major issues. we expect to hear the president outline tomorrow, joe. >> jess, is this the kitchen sink or are there things they held back on? >> reporter: well, what the president is describing it as is comprehensive and these are issues that they prioritize. i expect that the white house is is going to place a serious emphasis on this high-capacity magazine issue. i'm told that in private meeting the vice president has emphasized that the high capacity magazine could make as much of a difference, more of a difference, maybe, than any other pressure. he has pointed out to multip
that are going to allow for continuing operations of the federal government. the debt ceiling and sequestration for the debt ceiling, congressionally established limit on the amount of the public debt reached in the final days of 2012, and through emergency borrowing measures the treasury was able to continue funding the federal government. these issues should be revisited again probably in the next week. it's been quiet in dc this week. the sequestration act will allow federal obligations possibly is in this mid-february. the sequestration that was supposed to take effect on january 1 prevented cats to all discretionary funding programs. the highway trust fund that primarily funds the highway and transit account is protected, would not have been subjected to the sequestration got. the new starts funding programs, new source of funding for the central suburb project, we are keeping a close eye on that because there is a potential cut to the program. we are also keeping an i on the continuing resolution for the federal appropriations level. in october. in october 1, there was a six-m
better support the school district in the state and federal government has been unable to. given the crisis that has emerged of the data taking fourth in the summer juniors and sophomores, and seeing the data that almost half of those students are not on track to graduate, i felt that this was an appropriate and important way for our city to support the school district. i want to say again, i understand the debate that we have been engage again. i truly respect my colleagues that have been talking about finding other sources of funds for the school district. i do think that this is a good use of our state reserve funds. i think that when it is a question of our kids, about helping them graduate, for me it is never a question in this will always be a priority use of the funds. as we move forward i look forward to a continued dialogue with the mayor's office, the school district, about how we can continue to better support embedded partner with the school district. through this conversation it has been quite fruitful, looking at a lot of different avenues even if we are not able t
was in the late 1990's, 2000's. people are talking a lot about issues on stability and asking government, like ours, to be with them in the long term, and to create relationships. certainly, for capital investors, it really is that relationship building. they want that face-to-face time with investors around our city. so we are creating conditions for that to happen. they are not short-term leases, these are long-term leases. twitter signed in for a good 10 years. others have signed long-term leases as well. they are in it for the long haul. i think they are measuring their success, building it up on that. not only innovating and starting up, we want them to stay and grow. we have been creating those conditions for that conversation to happen. >> michael connolly said, anything to add to that? is this the right time in the valley? is there a bubble? >> i would like to speak about the clean technology sector. there was a little bit of a bubble that emerged in 2005, 2006, 2007 time frame. what has happened since then is you see the landscape changed. there have been a lot of companies and vc's,
for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work that they're doing. they're based here out of san francisco and they've got a great announcement to make. >> i am jon mills. i'm ceo of motion loft. we started about three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly h
what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compare
yesterday with one reference to the deficit. if no debt limit is reached, however, the government could default on its obligations within weeks so watch that story. martha: well, this is an interesting one. pro golfer, phil mickelson, doing a little bit of backpedaling today saying he regrets the public comments he made on the issue of his taxes in california. mickelson said he may move out when he made the original comments, of the state, because all taxes combined end up to more than 60% tax rate. now he is telling fox news contributor jim gray, quote, finances and taxes are a personal matter and i should not have made a opinions of, on them public. i apologize to those who i have upset or insulted and i assure you i intend not to let it happen again. why would he feel the need to do that? stuart varney, joins me, anchor of "varney & company" on the fox business network. stuart, this is an interesting one. >> it really is. the left beat up on phil mickelson big-time because he complained about all the tax money he has now got to pay. specifically you had, basically the left is saying
several million in damage to the ship and the bridge. >> thank you very much. the federal government is coming after disgraced cycleing champion, lance armstrong, with a new tactic as he begins the journey to come clean. after years of denial this new information comes. katie? ought government will take legal action against lance armstrong. abc news, the "wall street journal", and "usa today" are reporting that the justice department is highly likely to join a lawsuit filed against armstrong by former teammate. abc says the suit alleges armstrong defrauded the u.s. government by denying 9 use of performance enhancing drugs because the postal service sponsored the raising career. if he loses he could pay a substantial amount of money to the government. right now the deadline to join the case is thursday for the department the same day his interview with oprah is schedule to air. sources say armstrong admitted the drug use to oprah and before 9 interview he apologized to the staff of the charity he founded. >> the biggest test for him is how well he apologizes. most of all, he will apo
of supervisors do not have actual governance of the schools, what we have done in san francisco over the years because of the work of people like -- and gavin newsom and others is that we have recognize that where our state and federal government have fallen short in fulfilling their duties and obligations to properly funding public schools we a city government have stepped in and fill those gaps. the important point is not for us and giving the school district money that it is already entitled to. i'm glad that we will comply with what the law already requires in the intent of those measures were. the whole point of the supplemental is to recognize that we have a fundamental problem in our hands. business as usual is no longer acceptable. we have a city of great wealth; we have the highest performing urban school district in the entire state of california. one of the highest performing urban school districts in the entire country. and yet, for certain groups of kids the system is failing them. and in fact we know that for certain kids that you are talking about, latino kids, african-america
thought you were talking about the san francisco charter. which guides all of us, and is a governing document. i think that name is confusing. secondarily, i'm struggling with the records of the city and the records of the planning department. and when i look at what is here, there is no acknowledgement that this plan use department is a part of the city. because what we do as a city is we actually pass laws that deal with public records. and on the ballot in 1999 was proposition "g". also known as the sunshine ordinance. and it requires an openness on public records, an open attitude that should be reflected in this document, because it is city policy. if we are not dealing with planning policy, we don't deal ballot in 19 -- was adopted by the voters and set planning department policy in 1986. so i'm looking for the policies. every time we go to the ballot, the people of the city adopt policies that, on -- not every time. we adopt policies on a regular basis that are supposed to guide the planning department. and the overwhelming policy is an openness of public records, and the reco
and information coming from the city governments for two years against drugs and drug cartels. knowing that there is another stage in the initiative, which is going to do the state government and not the government in this new phase of the initiative they think is necessary that the american people, the federal government in mexico and the united states in which we have a lot of hope in the government of mr. pena nieto and the government of mr. obama, that they can listen other voices on a very delicate subject to security. what are we doing, local governments facing challenges that sometimes go out of our hands and anyway we have to deal with them. there is no doubt that the main concern, for instance, in my city in northeast mexico is a border state with taxes. too often, cities have borders with the rio, texas that we also have my city on the southeast part of the state and it's a strategic location. my city the city of 670,000 people. it's a big city. the metropolitan area sharing the space which has two cities, our neighbors in another city, which is my city. there is no doubt tha
and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, next the navy in the coastal communities and in san feir fernandes island and doing an airlift to the most affected area. sanfernandes island is a very small island, only a thousand people living there, but it was completely destroyed. that's what we found when we arriving there, debris everywhere, and as you can see that was the port and the square before, and that was after. so the change is, it's quite impressive. the same was a local pier and a school. that was a school. nothing. so we put in the navy, the navy put them in there two, three combat ships, type 23's and l ship and transport plus mtaa aircraft transport, aircraft and hell helicopters to try to help people in there. we used the ships to deliver food, clothes and all that stuff without any problem. also we helped in different matters that the navy can do that. for instance here was with divers and with submarine robot to find bodies. getting medical assistance,
and local government. when i think about the hate crimes cases and the other cases i've done, i've made friends for life with local law enforcement officers, with local da's and local community leaders who have been our eyes and ears. when i look around this audience i really appreciate the fact you have all the ingredients of reform and improvement. i have had the privilege of serving in the federal government, as melinda described, i've had the privilege of serving in state government as a state cabinet official back in maryland, i've had the privilege of serving as a local elected official and governor -- once a local elected official, always a local elected official. what i learned from that is partnership is what it's all about. if you want to confront the most vexing problems, you have to bring people across an ideological spectrum, you have to include the business community, you have to include our nonprofit, our faith leaders. that's how you get things done, when you bring people together. and i look around this room and i see that you have already figured that out. i hope
this government. we've got to stop lurching from crisis to crisis to crisis, when there's this clear path ahead of us that simply requires some discipline, some responsibility and some compromise. that's where we need to go. that's how this needs to work. major garrett. >> thank you, mr. president. as you well know, sir, finding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated. you, yourself, as a member of the senate, voted against a debt ceiling increase. and in previous aspects of american history -- president reagan in 1985, president george herbert walker bush in 1990, president clinton in 1997 -- all signed deficit reduction deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of american presidents and the debt ceiling, and your own history on the debt ceil
. that being said, president obama only fanned the flames today painting a picture of government catastrophe based on the facts seems a bit trumped up. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. >> reporter: in the first press conference of his second term, president obama wasted little time scaring the day lights out of millions of americans who rely on government paychecks for one service or another, of the consequences of a u.s. default. >> may not be able to pay our troops or honor our contracts with small business owners. food inspectors, air traffic controllers, specialists who track down nuclear materials wouldn't get their paychecks. >> reporter: the president's statement is speculative and not true because, frankly, no one knows what programs will be short changed if the u.s. can't meet its payment obligations. it's never happened before. but here is what we do know courtesy of the bipartisan policy center. if congress fails to raise the debt ceiling the government can spend only what it received in daily revenues each day. those revenues won't cover about 40% of g
of the american people and to govern the. "national review" as a very intellectual magazine throughout its existence and i think probably even more so in its early years in the 50s and 60's. a very much needed i think bill buckley managing editor and every other major person there acknowledge to that they very much needed a man just like bill rusher to serve as a lyrical eyes and ears, as a political counselor, as a link between "national review" type people. as rusher tended to put it, the intellectuals and the practical politician. by politicians rusher didn't mean people aspired to public office but the mastermind of the goldwater campaign and the marshal of the goldwater campaign. white too was a politician and rusher was something of a politician. in other words if practitioner of actual politics. russia placed tremendous value on these people, and he was always trying with some success to get the more philosophical conservatives. a classic example of course being buckley himself to appreciate that sort of career and that sort of individual and that sort of effort. a lot of what you'l
the government's bills. >> please have a seat. >> reporter: president obama spoke from the white house to stake out a position on the debt limit. if congress doesn't improve an increase the government will run out of money to pay bills. president obama blasted republicans who said they won't raise it without dollar for dollar cuts to the budget. >> the issue here is whether or not america pays its bills. we are not a deadbeat nation. >> the problem is congress has already spent the money. what it would mean for the nation to not make payments. >> social security checks and veteran's benefits will be delayed. we might not be able to pay our troops. >> reporter: in response republicans pointed out president obama voted against increasing the debt limit as a senator. speaker of the house john boehner's office said debt is endangering's children future. theconsequences are real he said. >> the debate had a numbing effect on wall street today. the dow is up 18 to 13,507. the nasdaq is down 8 at 3,117. the s&p is down 1 at 1,470. >>> all of that in washington is being watched closely in sacramento b
'll see happening as well, government starts to become smarter, make better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we sell and a lot of different vertical. we also ha
the committee process to happen. this is an important part of city government to include public discussion and allowing people to talk. welcome class of 2013. thank you. >> president: thank you. next speaker. >> good afternoon. my name is ernestine wise [sounds like]. i want to congratulate all members of the board and welcome london breed and norman yee. congratulations. [indiscernible] the best one when whoever it is, a woman or black. for a woman there is a lot of anger about -- on the waterfront. a lot of people have voted for the unjustly, 31,000 signatures offer to put it on the ballot for the people to vote. remember, you are here to represent the people not the developers. furthermore we don't need high-rise condo, 136 feet. we don't need a park. i presided ferry park, along the waterfront. we don't need another little park on the waterfront. don't be convinced by this developer that he's doing the right thing, by breaking through jackson street and all that hogwash. vote the will of the people. that's what you are here to represent. thank you very much. >> next speaker. >> than
chance of remaining in balance. the risk are mostly what might happen from the federal government and cost impact that might flow to the state in a couple of minor risks. they stamped it "prudent. " first time i've seen that in 15 years. in the world transportation one of the key things is that the governor said we recognize the transportation-- has directed the transportation secretary to convene a series of stakeholder meetings and try to drive some suitable transportation funding solution as well as address what is the appropriate level for some of the revenues that go through transportation to enhance the availability of those funds. getting money to the local level. i might mention in the high-speed rail budget there seems to be most of the issue for rail funding was dealt with in last year's budget. there was no new appropriation mentioned in this year's budget. they are counting on the initial construction segment to move forward and the highlight in the governors budget, they are working in the north and south regional entities to develop a suitable set of boo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 473 (some duplicates have been removed)